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Meng Yee (Michael) Chuah

Ever Curious!

Meng Yee (Michael) Chuah

Meng Yee (Michael) Chuah

Ever Curious!



I am a mechatronics engineer with an expertise in sensing technologies, machine learning, and embedded computing. As part of the research team in the Biomimetic Robotics Laboratory, I help design, develop, and build the MIT Cheetah robot with Professor Sangbae Kim. Currently, I'm a Ph.D. candidate with the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). My strengths include engineering design, electronics fabrication, and rapid prototyping techniques.


As part of my graduate work, I have developed a multi-axis, large force detecting foot sensor for legged robots. It is a monolithic composite structure that is composed of a piezoresistive sensor array PCB completely embedded in a protective polyurethane rubber layer. The composite architecture allows for compliance and traction during ground contact, while deformation alters the measured stress distribution. Using machine learning, we are able to map the local sampling of stress inside the polymeric footpad to forces in three axes with high accuracy. This footpad sensor is intended for use on the MIT Cheetah to provide a complete picture of the ground interaction forces that is a necessity in enabling high-speed and dynamic ground locomotion.


There is also ongoing work in developing the next generation of the wearables in the form of smart shoes that are capable of real-time in-situ measurement of force data. This work will involve integrating the low-cost, lightweight, multi-axis force sensor that have been developed for use on the MIT Cheetah robot. The ultimate goal is to use these force sensing shoes to help assist the elderly and disabled during walking and for fall prevention and mitigation. Athletes can also benefit from the data collected during training to better optimize their workouts.

I am a mechatronics engineer with an expertise in sensing technologies, machine learning, and embedded computing. As part of the research team in the Biomimetic Robotics Laboratory, I help design, develop, and build the MIT Cheetah robot. with Professor Sangbae Kim. Currently, I'm a Ph.D. candidate with the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). My strengths include engineering design, electronics fabrication, and rapid prototyping techniques.

As part of my graduate work, I have developed a multi-axis, large force detecting foot sensor for legged robots. It is a monolithic composite structure that is composed of a piezoresistive sensor array PCB completely embedded in a protective polyurethane rubber layer. The composite architecture allows for compliance and traction during ground contact, while deformation alters the measured stress distribution. Using machine learning, we are able to map the local sampling of stress inside the polymeric footpad to forces in three axes with high accuracy. This footpad sensor is intended for use on the MIT Cheetah to provide a complete picture of the ground interaction forces that is a necessity in enabling high-speed and dynamic ground locomotion.

There is also ongoing work in developing the next generation of the wearables in the form of smart shoes that are capable of real-time in-situ measurement of force data. This work will involve integrating the low-cost, lightweight, multi-axis force sensor that have been developed for use on the MIT Cheetah robot. The ultimate goal is to use these force sensing shoes to help assist the elderly and disabled during walking and for fall prevention and mitigation. Athletes can also benefit from the data collected during training to better optimize their workouts.



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